Words that made the difference: BROWN vs the BOARD OF EDUCATION 

A play produced and staged by Cindy Acker 

The Conference Committee is proud to announce, as part of our 26th Montessori Conference a special opportunity to watch a live presentation of  an incredibly powerful play followed by a Meet-&-Greet the actors/author Reception on Friday, November 4th. This important production portrays the landmark case that stripped away constitutional sanctions for segregation by race, and made equal opportunity in education the law of the land.

Words That Made the Difference is excerpted from the five cases that were compiled into the landmark case, known as Brown vs. Board of Education. As the transcripts were voluminous, it was impossible to include everything. The play was created by pouring through the transcripts, looking at the sections that could be used without changing the words, and building them around the characters whose testimonies were most meaningful. A critical piece what was omitted was the Doll Case, which was a major basis for understanding how inferiority and discrimination can have lifelong effects on individuals. It was critical to pass Brown v Board – the uncertainty of the effect of what even the portrayal of that scene might do to a young actor, caused it to be left out. 

The three judges represented the three person judges in the five cases. Supreme Court Justice Earl Warren and Thurgood Marshall serve as bookends in the history of Brown – their words, as with the transcripts were unchanged. However, Carter’s closing arguments, compelling after the Doll Case testimony were used and juxtaposed against the landmark decision of Earl Warren.

*We are also accepting Patrons who wish to support the production. Patrons donating $250 will receive acknowledgment in the playbill and signage. If you wish to donate towards the play please click here *

“This play is dedicated to the memory of my parents, Darline Stella Bell Maxwell, and Washington Maxwell, who were born in 1930 in Topeka and Kansas City, Kansas, respectively, and for whom ‘Brown’ was a victory, because it set a precedent for other civil rights. Thank you, for holding the world for me – as one without limits.

The play is dedicated to those allies for equity, equality and fairness – the witnesses and plaintiffs, who courageously faced opposition from others, and the Supreme Court Justices, who provided a model of leading with integrity and justice for all.”  Cindy Acker 

Learn More about BvB and Segregation today

SOME OF THE HISTORY OF BROWN v BOARD OF EDUCATION

The Declaration of Independence noted that “all men are created equal.” However, this clause was not grounded in law until 1865/68 (ratifying of the 13th and 14th Amendments), which stated that slavery would end, and that all were to experience “equal protection of the law.” These rights were not fulfilled and are still in question to this day.

In 1896, the Supreme Court ruled against Homer Plessy, who refused to give up his seat in the “Whites Only” section of a train, stating that the 14th Amendment was not intended to “abolish distinctions based upon color.” Read More HERE

 

*We are also accepting Patrons who wish to support the production. Patrons donating $250 will receive acknowledgment in the playbill and signage. If you wish to donate towards the play please contact conferences@montessori.org*